Reconsidering Mandatory Minimum Sentences: The Arguments for and Against Potential Reforms

Comment by Jim Campbell

September 24th, 2021

At first blush it might be easy to think or say, put the guy behind bars, that’s where he belongs, or as some police officers will admit on the not cleanest of busts, “Well if they didn’t do this one they probably did another one.

Prison corridor : Stock Photo

Listening to John Stossel’s take and the prosecutors he interviewed in the video below is telling.

It makes the entire process easier.

Exactly what kind of justice is that?

Hold on, if former prosecutor and part time Fox News analyst Leis Weihl a mind reader?

Does she have a crystal ball?

If our representatives in the House and the Senate were doing their jobs, these laws would have been overturned long ago.

Problematically, each state has their own mandatory minimum sentences which can be more severe than federal minimums.

There are also socioeconomic and racial components involved.

Blacks are incarcerated in state prisons across the country at more than five times the rate of whites, and at least ten times the rate in five states.

This report documents the rates of incarceration for whites, blacks, and Hispanics in each state, identifies three contributors to racial and ethnic disparities in imprisonment, and provides recommendations for reform.[Source]

The Heritage Foundation

Authors: Paul Larkin Jr. and Evan Bernick

Summary Mandatory minimum sentences are the product of good intentions, but good intentions do not always make good policy; good results are also necessary. Recognizing this fact, there are public officials on both sides of the aisle who support amending some components of federal mandatory minimum sentencing laws.

But before such reform can proceed, Congress must ask itself: With respect to each crime, is justice best served by having legislatures assign fixed penalties to that crime?

Or should legislatures leave judges more or less free to tailor sentences to the aggravating and mitigating facts of each criminal case within a defined range?

Key Takeaways

Today, public officials on both sides of the aisle support amending the federal mandatory minimum sentencing laws.

The U.S. Senate is considering two bills that would revise the federal sentencing laws in the case of mandatory minimum sentences.

Each proposal might be a valuable step forward in criminal justice policy, but it is difficult to predict the precise impact that each one would have. Copied

Select a Section 1/0

Is justice best served by having legislatures assign fixed penalties to each crime? Or should legislatures leave judges more or less free to tailor sentences to the aggravating and mitigating facts of each criminal case within a defined range?

Please see the entire article below the page break.

About JCscuba

I am firmly devoted to bringing you the truth and the stories that the mainstream media ignores. This site covers politics with a fiscally conservative, deplores Sharia driven Islam, and uses lots of humor to spiceup your day. Together we can restore our constitutional republic to what the founding fathers envisioned and fight back against the progressive movement. Obama nearly destroyed our country economically, militarily coupled with his racism he set us further on the march to becoming a Socialist State. Now it's up to President Trump to restore America to prominence. Republicans who refuse to go along with most of his agenda RINOs must be forced to walk the plank, they are RINOs and little else. Please subscribe at the top right and pass this along to your friends, Thank's I'm J.C. and I run the circus
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