The United Socialist Republic of Oregon

Comments by Jim Campbell
February 4th, 2019

The Socialist Party of Oregon is the name of three closely related organizations — an Oregon state affiliate of the Social Democratic Party of America established in 1897 and continuing into the 1950s, as well as the Oregon state affiliate of the Socialist Party USA from 1992 to 1999.
The Socialist Party of Oregon was founded in 1901, at the same time as the Socialist Party of America.
The national party was the result of a merger of the Social Democratic Party (1897) with a wing of the Socialist Labor Party (1876). It also drew locally from several utopian communities, such as Socialist Valley, founded in 1895.
The Socialist Party drew its strongest support in Oregon in Jackson, Josephine, and Coos counties, where Debs came close to winning with over one-third of the vote in 1912.
That year, Coquille elected a socialist mayor, Medford almost elected a socialist councilman as mayor, and Roseburg almost put a young socialist lawyer in the mayor’s office.

 

In 1914, St. Johns elected Socialist Party candidate A.W. Vincent as mayor. 
As late as 1919, there were 2,000 members in Portland‘s Socialist Party, which was divided into seven “locals”—one each for German, Swedish, Finnish, Lettish, and Estonian speakers and two for “Americans” (the largest) on the east and west sides of the city.
Though remnants of the party still exist, their numbers are so low that they don’t have any significant effect on current elections.
Even in 1920, with Debs in prison for opposing U.S. intervention in World War I, almost 10,000 Oregonians (4.1 percent) voted for him in his last presidential campaign.
The Socialist Party drew its strongest support in Oregon in Jackson, Josephine, and Coos counties, where Debs came close to winning with over one-third of the vote in 1912.
That year, Coquille elected a socialist mayor, Medford almost elected a socialist councilman as mayor, and Roseburg almost put a young socialist lawyer in the mayor’s office.
Please see the entire article below.

 

 

In 1914, St. Johns elected Socialist Party candidate A.W. Vincent as mayor. As late as 1919, there were 2,000 members in Portland‘s Socialist Party, which was divided into seven “locals”—one each for German, Swedish, Finnish, Lettish, and Estonian speakers and two for “Americans” (the largest) on the east and west sides of the city.
The Socialist Party came under attack during and after World War I for its radical wing’s opposition to the war and support for the Russian revolution.
By 1932, the party had abandoned its radical commitment to class struggle and, led by Norman Thomas, won about 15,000 votes in Oregon.
In 1948, when Thomas ran his last race (garnering only 5,000 votes in Oregon), the party splintered but continued to have an occasional presence on the ballot.
In 1996, Socialist presidential candidate Mary Hollis attracted just fewer than 2,000 votes in Oregon.
The Multnomah County Socialist party continues to meet monthly at the Belmont Library.
Among prominent Oregon residents who at one time supported the Socialist Party were C.E.S. Wood, William Z. Foster, Tom Burns, Will Daley, Floyd Ramp, Monroe Sweetland, and Wallace Priestly.
Dedicated to an electoral transition from capitalism to socialism, the party’s base was a coalition of urban European immigrants and native-born Americans from rural areas.
Less radical than the revolutionary Industrial Workers of the World, the Socialist Party attracted almost 10 percent of the Oregon electorate for Eugene V. Debs in 1912.
The party was re-organized in 1992 by at-large members of the Socialist Party USA, including the organization’s 2004 Presidential candidate Walt Brown, Bill Smaldone, James Hadley, Trey Smith, and others with interest in democratic socialism. The Socialist Party of Oregon is recognized as both an activist organization and an electoral vehicle. The Socialist Party of Oregon was a supporter early on of the Health Care for All-Oregon ballot measure, a participant in the successful unionizing effort at Powell’s, a continuing presence in the peace movement, and Oregon’s electoral arm for democratic socialist electoral politics.
The party regained electoral ballot status through acquisition of ballot lines previously held by others; the No Sales Tax Party was acquired circa 1994 (changing its name to the Socialist Party thereafter) and the Representative Party was acquired in the same year (also changing its name). In 1995, the ballot line of the New Alliance Party was acquired, giving the Socialist Party of Oregon statewide minor party status

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About JCscuba

I am firmly devoted to bringing you the truth and the stories that the mainstream media ignores. Together we can restore our constitutional republic to what the founding fathers envisioned and fight back against the progressive movement. Obama nearly destroyed our country economically, militarily coupled with his racism he set us further on the march to becoming a Socialist State. Now it's up to President Trump to restore America to prominence. Republicans who refuse to go along with most of his agenda RINOs must be forced to walk the plank, they are RINOs and little else.
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