UPDATE: What Will Happen If The U.S. Leaves Afghanistan Prematurely

Stated simply, one gigantic, transnational jihadist region in South Asia will come to exist.

 

The U.S. and allied forces are definitely in the proverbial place, between “A Rock and a hard place.”

According to Sellin, despite Pakistan’s best efforts to install Taliban rule in Afghanistan and facilitate the spread of radical Islam, the U.S. Military and combined forces have been dampening their enthusiasm. 🙂

The U.S./NATO presence may be the only fragile barrier preventing a large portion of South Asia from becoming the next Syria, but with nuclear arms in the balance.

 

 

The local media reports in Pakistan, the additional forces were deployed after negotiations failed between the Afghan and Pakistani officials regarding the issue.

According to Jim Compton, Afghanistan’s a cluster of mountains the west end of the Himalayas.

 

The human sweepings of central Asia have been piling up in those hills since time immemorial.

Nobody has ever really conquered the place, including any single one or even a combination of its tribes.

The only thing they have in common is a toxic and intolerant religion.

The only thing the Afghanis admire and respect are the raw and brutal exercise of power.

Just everybody has conquered the place: Persians, Greeks, Indians, Mongols, Moguls, Russians, Brits, and now us.

They all left their marks on the landscape, but none mattered to the Afghans.

When we move out, Afghanistan will continue in its nasty old ways.

Pakistan sent army troops and additional Khasadar Force and Frontier Corps personnel on the border on Thursday in retaliation to Afghanistan’s reinforcement of its troops and border security forces along the border, the reports added.

Let’s begin by describing what, in the news media, appears to be two different events, but are really the same thing.

On July 23, 2016, the Washington Post reported on a U.S.-Afghan military operation against the Islamic State in Khorasan (ISIS-K) in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, which forms the border with Pakistan’s Khyber Agency in the restive, terrorist-infested Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA).

 

In April, the U.S. military dropped its largest non-nuclear bomb, a MOAB “the mother of all bombs,” on a cave complex known to be occupied by ISIS-K in the Achin’s district of Nangarhar.

 

Yep, messing with the U.S. military by land, sea or air, often gets a tad messy.

On July 23, 2016, Pakistani news reported that the Pakistani Army announced that it has cleared two strongholds of terrorists in the Khyber Agency bordering Afghanistan after gaining control of a key mountain top.

 

THE DAILY CALLER NEWS FOUNDATION
Lawrence Sellin, Ph.D.
JULY, 26, 2017
 
Retired Colonel, U.S. Army Reserve
Lawrence Sellin, Ph.D. is a retired US Army Reserve colonel, an IT command and control subject matter expert, trained in Arabic and Kurdish, and a veteran of Afghanistan, northern Iraq and a humanitarian mission to West Africa.

U.S. Marines attacking Afghanistan from the air by c-130 gunship.

Their civil military team is comprised of members of the U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, the U.S. Department of State and the Agency for International Development (USAID).

(U.S. Navy photo by Chief Hospital Corpsman Josh Ives/Released) 130109-N-IE116-388

The operation had been launched to prevent the Islamic State terror group from making forays into Pakistan, from its stronghold in Nangarhar across the Afghan border through collaboration with Pakistani terrorist groups having sanctuaries in the Rajgal Valley.

Both reports are describing basically the same group of terrorists.

Their civil military team is comprised of members of the U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, the U.S. Department of State and the Agency for International Development (USAID). (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Hospital Corpsman Josh Ives/Released) 130109-N-IE116-388

The operation had been launched to prevent the Islamic State terror group from making forays into Pakistan from its stronghold in Nangarhar across the Afghan border through collaboration with Pakistani terrorist groups having sanctuaries in the Rajgal Valley.”

Both reports are describing basically the same group of terrorists.

The original leadership of ISIS-K was mostly Pakistani, defectors from the Pakistani Taliban, the Tehrik-e Taliban Pakistan or TTP.

See the entire article below.

 

The ranks of ISIS-K were filled with members of a variety of other Pakistani terrorist groups such as Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ), who were recruited and sent to Syria to fight alongside Syrian rebels against the Assad regime. 

The presence of ISIS-K in Afghanistan’s Nangarhar Province is largely due to Pakistani clearing operations in the FATA, whereby those now affiliated with ISIS-K in Afghanistan were seeking a safe haven from the Pakistan Army.

Nearly all of the present Afghanistan-Pakistan cross-border terrorist activity can be traced back to Pakistan’s decades-old “Islamization” policy, the proliferation of extremist Deobandi Islamic schools “madrasas” and Pakistan’s use of radical Islam to suppress ethnic separatism internally and as an instrument of its foreign policy.

If the U.S. would withdraw prematurely, a Pakistan-supported Taliban government would be in control of Afghanistan within twelve months.

That would not, as many would like to believe, decrease Islamic terrorism in South Asia. Quite the opposite.

The number and strength of Islamic terrorist groups now operating in Pakistan are far greater than they were on September 11, 2001 and the Pakistani authorities are fast losing control of their terrorist proxies.

 

Although presently dependent on Pakistan for its survival, the Afghan Taliban, once in control in Kabul, would likely reverse the flow of insurgency back into Pakistan both east into the FATA and south into Balochistan, exploiting their existing terrorist infrastructure and expanding to other areas the type of cross border terrorism seen between Pakistan’s Khyber Agency and Afghanistan’s Nangarhar Province.

Unlike their Pakistani sponsors, the Afghan Taliban have never accepted the Durand Line as the permanent border between Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Unless measures are taken to avert it, the next transnational terrorist hotbed will be Balochistan, where the Islamic State already has a foothold in the form of affiliates like Lashkar-e-Khorasan and Lashkar-e-Jhangvi al-Alami, who both seek ever purer and ever more extreme forms of fundamental Sunni Islam.

Instead of focusing exclusively on troop levels and tweaking a questionable counterinsurgency strategy in Afghanistan, U.S. policymakers should be looking beyond current conditions.

For example, support for Balochistan’s secular independence movement would drive a stake into the heart of radical Islam in the region.

 

 

 

THE END

Advertisements

About JCscuba

I am firmly devoted to bringing you the truth and the stories that the mainstream media ignores. Together we can restore our constitutional republic to what the founding fathers envisioned and fight back against the progressive movement, Obama and the liberal media.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to UPDATE: What Will Happen If The U.S. Leaves Afghanistan Prematurely

  1. JAFC says:

    Afghanistan s a cluster of mountains the west end of the Himalayas. The human sweepings of central Asia have been piling up in those hills since time immemorial. Nobody has ever really conquered the place, including any single one or even a combination of its tribes.

    The only thing they have in common is a toxic and intolerant religion. The only thing the Afghanis admire and respect is the raw and brutal exercise of power.

    Just everybody has conquered the place: Persians, Greeks, Indians, Mongols, Moguls, Russians, Brits, and now us. They all left their marks on the landscape, but none mattered to the Afghans.

    When we move out Afghanistan will continue in its nasty old ways.

    Like

    • JCscuba says:

      Thanks, for your comments Jim, you are one hell of a student of world history. I can always cound on you to make my articles better, Best, J.C. P.S. I’m going to move your comment’s to the actual article and mention your contribution, thanks, J.C.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s