What if America Had Won the War in Vietnam? Two Scenarios

By Jim Campbell,

May 1st, 2017

 

I happened to come across the video below at the same time I was looking for an outtake on Michael Moore’s new movie, his celebration of America’s loss of the Vietnam War.

Did we lose the war or was it the pathetic democrat leadership that led Americans to believe a false narrative?

 

 

 

Uncle Walter did his part by bringing his downbeat messages by television into our homes, usually at dinner.

For his part, Cronkite was just one of many shills.

Ask those who fought there and returned home alive.

The Vietnam Memorial is a testimony to those who gave their all and then some being killed in action.

For his part, Moore is a Marxist who has enjoyed the wonders of capitalism to make his fortune.

 

 

 

As for Michael Moore’s coverage, it will be just another leftist narrative that we have heard about from John Kerry when he testified before congress that our troops were murderers and baby killers.

We lost the Vietnam War 42yrs ago today or so goes the narrative we have been told to believe. 

Should be a national holiday, a commitment to never make the same mistake again?

Yep, the Paris Peace talks which dragged on from 1969-1973 allowed President the concept of ending the war, so-called, “Peace with Honor, that President Johnson had so poorly led before he announced he would not seek election.

It quickly became apparent that the public peace talks in Paris were being used as propaganda theater by both sides, and that any productive negotiations would have to be done in private. On August 4, the President’s Assistant for National Security Affairs

On August 4, the President’s Assistant for National Security Affairs Henry Kissinger conducted his first private session with the North Vietnamese leadership. He would meet with North Vietnamese Politburo member Le Duc Tho intermittently over the following months, with no apparent progress toward a settlement.

He would meet with North Vietnamese Politburo member Le Duc Tho intermittently over the following months, with no apparent progress toward a settlement.

See the entire article below.

In the fall of 1969, disappointed with the lack of any visible results from this strategy, Nixon and Kissinger directed an extensive planning effort assessing the possibility of coercing the North Vietnamese into negotiations through a series of “short, sharp blows” inflicted by air and naval forces.

The political-military planning included a cell of National Security Council staff members examining strategic issues, and a military planning team comprised of Joint Staff, Pacific Command (PACOM), and Military Assistance Command Vietnam (MACV) officers working at MACV Headquarters in Saigon.

Nixon met with the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) on October 11, and it became clear that the planning had satisfied neither the White House nor the JCS.

With American casualties on the decline, the anti-war movement still a powerful force, and no satisfactory political-military solution in sight, Nixon turned away from that option to deliver the “silent majority” speech on November 3, 1969, rallying the American people toward patient support for a protracted war.

The administration would continue its dual strategy of Vietnamization and negotiation.

The political-military planning included a cell of National Security Council staff members examining strategic issues, and a military planning team comprised of Joint Staff, Pacific Command (PACOM), and Military Assistance Command Vietnam (MACV) officers working at MACV Headquarters in Saigon. Nixon met with the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) on October 11, and it became clear that the planning had satisfied neither the White House nor the JCS.

With American casualties on the decline, the anti-war movement still a powerful force, and no satisfactory political-military solution in sight, Nixon turned away from that option to deliver the “silent majority” speech on November 3, 1969, rallying the American people toward patient support for a protracted war. The administration would continue its dual strategy of Vietnamization and negotiation.

The political-military planning included a cell of National Security Council staff members examining strategic issues, and a military planning team comprised of Joint Staff, Pacific Command (PACOM), and Military Assistance Command Vietnam (MACV) officers working at MACV Headquarters in Saigon.

Nixon met with the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) on October 11, and it became clear that the planning had satisfied neither the White House nor the JCS.

With American casualties on the decline, the anti-war movement still a powerful force, and no satisfactory political-military solution in sight, Nixon turned away from that option to deliver the “silent majority” speech on November 3, 1969, rallying the American people toward patient support for a protracted war.

The administration would continue its dual strategy of Vietnamization and negotiation.

Nixon met with the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) on October 11, and it became clear that the planning had satisfied neither the White House nor the JCS.

With American casualties on the decline, the anti-war movement still a powerful force, and no satisfactory political-military solution in sight, Nixon turned away from that option to deliver the “silent majority” speech on November 3, 1969, rallying the American people toward patient support for a protracted war.

The administration would continue its dual strategy of Vietnamization and negotiation.

With American casualties on the decline, the anti-war movement still a powerful force, and no satisfactory political-military solution in sight, Nixon turned away from that option to deliver the “silent majority” speech on November 3, 1969, rallying the American people toward patient support for a protracted war.

The administration would continue its dual strategy of Vietnamization and negotiation.

In March 1970 the fall of Prince Norodom Sihanouk in Cambodia destroyed the fragile neutrality of that state, as his successor Lon Nol demanded the North Vietnamese withdraw from their base camps along the South Vietnamese border.

The North Vietnamese reacted by extending their presence toward the west. Nixon responded by ordering a US-South Vietnamese “incursion” into Cambodia on April 30. Limited by Nixon to a 30-kilometer strip along the border, and limited in time to the end of June

The North Vietnamese reacted by extending their presence toward the west. Nixon responded by ordering a US-South Vietnamese “incursion” into Cambodia on April 30. Limited by Nixon to a 30-kilometer strip along the border, and limited in time to the end of June.

In the end, the North quickly overran the South sending those with any education to the fields to work and be re- indoctrinated.

We all know what followed with Pol Pot and his murderous regime known as the “Killing Fields .”

THE END

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4 thoughts on “What if America Had Won the War in Vietnam? Two Scenarios

  1. A ‘Nam Army Spec. Ops. friend of
    mine and I were talking about the
    JFK assassination few days ago..
    His words about the Huey Chopper made me
    ILL as does everything about what our
    politicians sent our guys into..
    Interesting post JC..

    “LBJ Counter Manned JFK’s EO To Evacuate All US Forces. Lady Bird Had
    Controlling Shares In Bell Helicopter. The Manufacturer Of The UH-1
    “Huey” Helicopter. HALF Of All Deployed There Were Shot Down, And
    Needed Replaced.
    The “Deep State” Goes WAY Back?”

    Like

    • I did not know the connection between Ladybird and Bell. Jeeze we have been such fools, I question everything now. “Trust No One”~ Fox Mulder The X-Files

      Like

  2. As a young airman receiving orders to go “in country,” I was proud to represent my country to promote democracy to this troubled world. After all, that was what war was all about, right? Doing the right thing for humanity? Needless to say, I got educated real quickly on what the war was all about. Pure politics and the elation of the elite! We were sacrificed for the almighty dollar. Fortunately I came home in one piece despite having my own experience with a shot-down Huey. I used up one of my nine lives there. Others weren’t so lucky. Their names are on “the wall.” Every time I read the names of the lost and recognize those I served with who didn’t come home, I shed a thousand tears. The war was friggin useless but we did not lose it. We walked away. Had we not walked away, it would have been a different scenario today. You better believe it!

    To my fellow Vietnam vets who are still around and probably suffering today, “welcome home.” We never heard that 40-50 years ago!

    Like

    • Moving, excellent remarks General. I was writing propaganda for the U.S. Army at the time. Why? Because I knew the government “Would never lie to us.”

      Liked by 1 person

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